This course is part of Coding/STEAM Curriculum - Middle School Plan

Middle School Plan
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Programming 301

A fast-paced introduction to block programming for beginners in middle school where they create simple interactive programs with a focus on game design. Request Quote

Course Summary
  • Grades 7 - 8
  • Beginner level
  • 17 lessons
  • Tynker Blocks
    • Web
Course Includes
  • 17 lessons
  • 111 activities
  • Enhanced Creativity Tools
  • Automatic Assessment
  • Tutorials and Reviews
  • Coding Puzzles
  • DIY Projects
  • Quizzes
  • Teacher Guides
  • Answer Keys
Prerequisites
No previous coding experience required.

Programming 301 Lesson Plan

Lesson: Boss Battle
Time: 60+ mins

Introduction

In this lesson, students will combine cloning and variables to create an epic battle between a dragon and an enemy boss airship! Coding concepts from this lesson include: Glide and Repeat Until with Variable.

New Code Blocks

  • : Actor will glide to the specified x- and y-coordinates over a specified length of time.

Vocabulary

  • None

Objectives

Students will...
  • Use code blocks to create loops with variables
  • Use code blocks to solve a puzzle module
  • Create games that include boss battles

Materials

  • Computers, laptops, or mobile devices (1 per student) with student account access to Tynker.com

Warm-Up (15 minutes)

  • As a class, review code blocks. Ask students, “What does the _____ code block do?” Here’s a list of recommended code blocks to review, which students will use in today’s lesson: “repeat until,” “forever,” “turn,” “set to.”

Activities (45 minutes)

Facilitate as students complete all Boss Battle modules on their own:
1. Concepts (Video)
  • Dan, the dragon rider, introduces two coding concepts:
    • Glide- Students will interact with different “effect” code blocks and observe how each code block affects Codey.
    • Repeat Until with Variable- Students will watch an animated example of the “repeat until” loop used with a “set to” variable code block and observe how it affects Codey.
2. Boss Battle (DIY)
  • In this DIY (do-it-yourself) project, students will follow step-by-step directions to add an enemy boss airship with lots of health!
  • Activities include setting the boss’s health with a variable, using “glide” code blocks to make the boss move in a triangle pattern, programming the boss to lose health, and animating the boss when it takes damage.
  • Students will add to this project in the next module.
3. Boss Strikes Back (DIY)
  • In this DIY project, students will create a powerful boss that can shoot multiple lasers at the dragon!
  • Point out to students that the lasers do not currently cause damage to the dragon. Bonus: Challenge your students to program the dragon to disappear after taking 6 hits from the laser.
4. You’re the Boss (Puzzle)
  • To solve this puzzle module, students will need to program the boss and laser red Actors.
  • Give a hint for the boss Actor. Ask students…
    • What should the variable be set to? (Answer: The “health” variable should be set to a value of 100.)
    • Which code blocks need to go inside the “forever” loop to make the boss repeatedly move to 3 locations? (Answer: There should be three “glide” blocks with different x- and y-coordinates inside the “forever” loop.)
  • Give a hint for the laser red Actor. Ask students…
    • When the laser red Actor is cloned, what code block will you use to run/program the clone? (Answer: The “clone startup” block.)
5. Boss Rush (DIY)
  • In this DIY project, students will create a game with multiple boss fights!
  • Activities include adding a score that goes up each time a boss is defeated, adding different levels, programming the boss to look and move differently each time it returns, and setting the health of a boss to a different value every time a clone is created.
  • Optional: Explain to students that some video games like to give players an extra challenge by making them fight several bosses, one after the other. Can they think of any examples?
6. Quiz (Multiple-choice)
  • Students will answer 5 multiple-choice questions to review concepts from this lesson.

Extended Activities (10 minutes)

Show and Tell!
  • Encourage students to share their Boss Rush game with the class! Have students share their coding challenges and what they learned from them. Also share other challenges you saw students dealing with and the solutions you noticed they came up with.

U.S. Standards

  • CCSS-Math: 6.NS.C.6, MP.1, MP.2, MP.4, MP.7
  • CCSS-ELA: RI.7.4, RI.8.4, 6-8.RST.3, 6-8.RST.4, 6-8.RST.7
  • CSTA: 2-AP-10, 2-AP-11, 2-AP-13, 2-AP-16, 2-AP-17
  • CS CA: 6-8.AP.10, 6-8.AP.11, 6-8.AP.13, 6-8.AP.17
  • ISTE: 1.c, 1.d, 4.d, 5.c, 5.d, 6.b

U.k. Standards

Key Stage 3 (Years 7-9)
  • Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.
  • Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability.
  • Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.